National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation

Level: (Any)

Category:Engaging Indigenous Learners

Added:Monday, December 4, 2017

Web site: http://nctr.ca/about-new.php

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What We Do


A shared vision held by those affected by Indian residential schools was to create a place of learning and dialogue where the truths of their experiences were honoured and kept safe for future generations. They wanted their families, communities and all of Canada to learn from these hard lessons so they would not be repeated. They wanted to share the wisdom of the Elders and Traditional Knowledge Keepers on how to create just and peaceful relationships amongst diverse peoples. They knew that Reconciliation is not only about the past; it is about the future that all Canadians will forge together. This vision is the legacy gift to all of Canada.

As the permanent home for all statements, documents, and other materials gathered by the TRC the NCTR will ensure that:

  • former students and their families have access to their own history;
  • educators can share the Indian Residential School history with future generations of students;
  • researchers can more deeply explore the Residential School experience;
  • the public can access historical records and other materials to help foster reconciliation and healing; and
  • the history and legacy of the residential school system are never forgotten


Our Background


For over 150 years, residential schools operated in Canada. Over 150,000 children attended these schools. Many never returned. Often underfunded and overcrowded, these schools were used as a tool of assimilation by the Canadian state and churches. Thousands of students suffered physical and sexual abuse. All suffered from loneliness and a longing to be home with their families. The damages inflicted by these schools continue to this day. In 2009, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada began a multi-year process to listen to Survivors, communities and others affected by the Residential School system. The resulting collection of statements, documents and other materials now forms the heart of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation.

Retrieved from: http://nctr.ca/about-new.php, December 4, 2017.